WAMU 88.5 : News

Local Immigration Activists Blast Fast Track Deportation Plan

Play associated audio

The White House wants Congress to authorize an additional $2 billion to address the Central American children crisis on the border. Some of the provisions are being denounced by local immigration activists who work with the region's large Central American immigrant community.

At issue is President Obama's expected request that Congress change existing laws and regulations in order to fast track the deportation of the nearly 60,000 children detained after crossing the border alone and illegally. That process currently takes anywhere from nine to 18 months. During that time period, the children are normally released into the care of parents or relatives here, many of whom are themselves undocumented.

The provision to fast track the process in the hope that it will discourage parents from paying smugglers to bring their children here is being blasted by local immigration activists.

"What they are planning to do, detain and deport these children back into these awful circumstances of highly likely violence and even death is shameful," says Sheena Wadhawan with CASA de Maryland.

The metro D.C. area is home to one of the largest Central American immigrant communities in the nation. Some of the unaccompanied children who were detained by immigration authorities are already here after being reunited with their families. They are currently waiting for their deportation process to run its course.

Those who support a strong line against undocumented immigration say the White House is practicing damage control now by trying to fix a problem it created by not enforcing current immigration law.

NPR

'Never Crossing The Botox Rubicon': Amanda Peet Explores Aging In Hollywood

NPR's Kelly McEvers speaks with actress Amanda Peet about her Lenny Letter essay, "Never Crossing The Botox Rubicon," and how to navigate aging in the image-obsessed entertainment industry.
NPR

When It Came To Food, Neanderthals Weren't Exactly Picky Eaters

During the Ice Age, it seems Neanderthals tended to chow down on whatever was most readily available. Early humans, on the other hand, maintained a consistent diet regardless of environmental changes.
NPR

4 Ways Donald Trump's Pro Wrestling Experience Is Like His Campaign Today

At least none of Trump's political opponents have been strapped down and had their heads shaved by him.
NPR

'The Guardian' Launches New Series Examining Online Abuse

A video was released this week where female sports journalists were read abusive online comments to their face. It's an issue that reaches far beyond that group, and The Guardian is taking it on in a series called "The Web We Want." NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with series editor Becky Gardiner and writer Nesrine Malik, who receives a lot of online abuse.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.