Local Immigration Activists Blast Fast Track Deportation Plan | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Local Immigration Activists Blast Fast Track Deportation Plan

Play associated audio

The White House wants Congress to authorize an additional $2 billion to address the Central American children crisis on the border. Some of the provisions are being denounced by local immigration activists who work with the region's large Central American immigrant community.

At issue is President Obama's expected request that Congress change existing laws and regulations in order to fast track the deportation of the nearly 60,000 children detained after crossing the border alone and illegally. That process currently takes anywhere from nine to 18 months. During that time period, the children are normally released into the care of parents or relatives here, many of whom are themselves undocumented.

The provision to fast track the process in the hope that it will discourage parents from paying smugglers to bring their children here is being blasted by local immigration activists.

"What they are planning to do, detain and deport these children back into these awful circumstances of highly likely violence and even death is shameful," says Sheena Wadhawan with CASA de Maryland.

The metro D.C. area is home to one of the largest Central American immigrant communities in the nation. Some of the unaccompanied children who were detained by immigration authorities are already here after being reunited with their families. They are currently waiting for their deportation process to run its course.

Those who support a strong line against undocumented immigration say the White House is practicing damage control now by trying to fix a problem it created by not enforcing current immigration law.

NPR

Former Basketball Player Scores As A Filmmaker

While Deon Taylor was playing professional basketball in Germany, he had an epiphany: he wanted to make movies. The self-taught director's latest film, Supremacy, was released this Friday.
NPR

Surströmming Revisited: Eating Sweden's Famously Stinky Fish

Sweden has the distinction of producing surströmming, one of the foulest-smelling foods in the world. More than a decade ago, NPR's Ari Shapiro tried eating it and failed. It's time for a rematch.
NPR

What Romney's Retreat Means For GOP Hopefuls

NPR's Scott Simon speaks with senior Washington editor Ron Elving about the narrowing Republican presidential field for 2016 and what we've seen so far in the first month of the new Congress.
NPR

The Infinite Whiteness Of Public Radio Voices

The hashtag #publicradiovoices, about the "whiteness" of public radio, trended on Twitter this week. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Gene Demby of NPR's Code Switch team about the conversation.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.