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Justin Rose Repeats At Quicken Loans National Golf Tournament

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Justin Rose sits next to the Quicken Loans trophy, which he won for the second time this weekend.
Matt Bush/WAMU
Justin Rose sits next to the Quicken Loans trophy, which he won for the second time this weekend.

The Quicken Loans National golf tournament went into sudden death at Congressional Country Club in Bethesda, and for repeat winner Justin Rose, it was sweet redemption.

He bogeyed the 18th hole during regulation, following up a poor tee shot with an even worse approach shot from the rough.

"I was hoping it was going to be the glory shot for a second or two off the face," Rose said. "But as I ran after it, I nearly tripped over the wire (which separates fans from the fairway) and nearly made a real fool of myself. As I chased after the ball I realized it was hooking pretty good had no chance of staying up."

That bogey forced a sudden death playoff with Shawn Stefani. But Rose parred the 18th when it was played as the first extra hole, while Stefani put his approach shot in the water, giving Rose a win for the second time at this tournament.

He also won in 2010, when the event was known as the AT&T National and was played outside of Philadelphia. The only other repeat winner of this tournament is host Tiger Woods, who missed the cut this year in his first event back since back surgery in March.

Next year, the tournament will be played across the Potomac River at the Robert Trent Jones Golf Club in Northern Virginia, before returning to Congressional in 2016. Club members earlier this year voted to hold the Quicken Loans National every other year until 2020.

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