WAMU 88.5 : News

Fort Reno Summer Concerts Back On

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After costly federal government requirements forced organizers to cancel the Fort Reno concert series, the popular summer event is back on.

Fans of local rock music were devastated last week when Fort Reno organizers announced the news: the series was being canceled for the first time in decades. This came after organizers received an unexpected bill from the U.S. Park Police: more than $2,600 for security.

But now, after a meeting Monday morning, the shows are back on.

"Sitting around the table face to face, we were able to work through the issues and resolve it," said Rock Creek Superintendent Tara Morrison, who announced the news on WAMU's Kojo Nnamdi Show, later adding that both the Park Police and Park Service will make changes to ensure events on federal parkland go through a more transparent process in the future.

Fort Reno organizers will still be expected to pay for officers to staff concerts, at $66 an hour. But that money no longer has to be paid in a lump sum upfront.

As for how to cover those costs, Fort Reno's Amanda MacKaye says she won't consider sponsorships for the proudly independent shows.

"Growing up in the D.C. punk scene... it's in my blood. I cannot sell out the music," she said today.

The eight-concert series will continue as planned, starting July 7, weather permitting.

For more about Fort Reno, visit WAMU 88.5's Bandwidth and kojoshow.org.
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