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Ocean City's Dew Tour Runs Up Against July 4 Celebration

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Part of the spectacle at the Dew Tour in Ocean City is the erection of massive stadiums right on the beach in the run up to the four-day action sports event. Some town officials are quietly concerned about this year’s tear down process.

It usually takes about two weeks and more than 100 tractor trailer trucks full of equipment and steel for Dew Tour organizers to build the stadiums on the beach.

The Ocean City leg of the the Dew Tour’s four-city tour has broken attendance records in the past two years, and while town officials are hoping to exceed the more than 90,000 folks who watched the event last year, the stress of tearing down the event’s massive footprint on the beach will be heightened this year because the July 4 weekend will be just days away.

Some town officials are admittedly worried that the two events could intersect and cause problems — that’s because the space where the Dew Tour stadiums are located is needed for the city’s extravagant fireworks display on Independence Day, but they are hopeful that its one trick the Dew Tour folks can pull off without a hitch.

One town official said it would certainly gain them maximum points with the city.

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