Plea Deal Falls Apart In Chris Brown Assault Case | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Plea Deal Falls Apart In Chris Brown Assault Case

Singer Chris Brown was close to a plea deal in his assault case that would have kept him out of jail, but the talks have fallen apart because prosecutors and defense attorneys can't agree on what the singer would acknowledge happened last year.

Brown was arrested in October outside a hotel and charged with misdemeanor assault. A fan accused the singer of hitting him when he tried to get in a photograph Brown was taking with two women. At the time, Brown was on probation for a 2009 attack on singer Rihanna, his then-girlfriend.

Prosecutor Kevin Chambers said Wednesday they offered a deal for Brown to plead guilty to simple assault and time served in the Washington case. But the Grammy-winning singer's attorney, Mark Geragos, said defense lawyers and prosecutors couldn't agree on a statement of facts about what happened outside the W Hotel.

Brown's trial was scheduled for Sept. 8.

Brown's bodyguard, Christopher Hollosy, was also charged in the same Washington scuffle. He was accused of being the second person after Brown to strike Parker Adams.

Hollosy was convicted of misdemeanor assault in April. He has not yet been sentenced.

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