In Wake Of Loss, Gansler Keeps His Tone Diplomatic | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

In Wake Of Loss, Gansler Keeps His Tone Diplomatic

Play associated audio
Maryland Gubernatorial candidate Attorney General Douglas Gansler lost to Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown on Tuesday.
(AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)
Maryland Gubernatorial candidate Attorney General Douglas Gansler lost to Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown on Tuesday.

It was a disappointing night for Maryland's current Attorney General, Doug Gansler, who was defeated in the Democratic gubernatorial primary by rival Lieutenant Governor Anthony Brown.

Any bubbles of optimism among Gansler supporters inside the ballroom at the Bethesda Marriott conference room popped pretty early in the night. Not much more than an hour after his election-night party started, reports of various news organizations calling the race for Lt. Governor Anthony Brown spread through the crowd.

Gansler loyalist Bill Dalton blamed Gansler's loss on a Democratic political establishment firmly in Anthony Brown's corner. "Doug would be more independent, and the establishment doesn't really want that in a governor," Dalton said.

Just after 10 p.m., Gansler emerged. He told the crowd that in spite of a race that had become remarkably contentious, he and Anthony Brown see eye to eye in many respects.

"We had a spirited debate on the issues, and we agree [on] a lot more than we disagree on, and we are both looking forward to making a better Maryland in the future," Gansler said.

But for Gansler's communications director Katie Hill, the election was about a new vision for Maryland's future—a vision, it seems, that voters didn't want. "You know, they showed that they didn't want a change—and our campaign was predicated upon bringing change to Maryland," Hill said.

Hill also lays some of the blame for Gansler's loss on Maryland's first-ever June primary. The state had previously held primaries in September. Hill says the new date contributed to low voter turnout, which hurt her candidate.

NPR

If Robots 'Speak,' Will We Listen? Novel Imagines A Future Changed By AI

As artificial intelligence alters human connection, Louisa Hall's characters wrestle with whether machines can truly feel. Some "feel they have to stand up for a robot's right to exist," Hall says.
NPR

Aphrodisiacs Can Spark Sexual Imagination, But Probably Not Libido

Going on a picnic with someone special? Make sure to pack watermelon, a food that lore says is an aphrodisiac. No food is actually scientifically linked to desire, but here's how some got that rep.
NPR

A Reopened Embassy In Havana Could Be A Boon For U.S. Businesses

When the U.S. reopens its embassy in Havana, it will increase its staff. That should mean more help for American businesses hoping to gain a foothold on the Communist island.
NPR

In A Twist, Tech Companies Are Outsourcing Computer Work To ... Humans

A new trend is sweeping the tech world: hiring real people. NPR's Arun Rath talks to Wired reporter Julia Greenberg about why tech giants are learning to trust human instinct instead of algorithms.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.