WAMU 88.5 : Art Beat

Art Beat With Lauren Landau, June 24

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June 24 to 29: Buyer & Cellar

Alex More’s acting career isn’t going too well, so when he gets the opportunity to work in Barbra Streisand’s basement, he takes it. The job might be the strangest he’s ever held, but he puts his retail and improv experience to good use playing shopkeeper in an underground shopping mall where nothing is really for sale because everything already belongs to his sole customer. Michael Urie stars in Buyer & Cellar, a one-man show that you can see at Shakespeare Theatre Company through Sunday.

June 24 to 29: Killer Joe

It’s not too late to see the dark comedy Killer Joe at DC Arts Center in Adams Morgan. Directed by Michael Wright, this graphic and violent play by Tracy Letts centers on the Smith family, who hire a hit man to take out a family member for her insurance money. But in lieu of a retainer fee, Killer Joe wants something other than money. You can see the play through Sunday.

Music: “Hey Joe (House Mix)” by The Majestics

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At 81, Disney's First African-American Animator Is Still In The Studio

First hired in the 1950s, Floyd Norman is still drawing. "Creative people don't hang it up," he says. "We don't walk away, we don't want to sit in a lawn chair. ... We want to continue to work. "
NPR

America's Real Mountain Of Cheese Is On Our Plates

To help dairy farmers hurt by a glut, the USDA said this week it'll buy $20 million worth of cheese and give it to food banks. But we eat so much of the stuff, that's hardly a drop in the bucket.
WAMU 88.5

Friday News Roundup - International

Italy searches for survivors after a devastating earthquake. Turkey escalates its role in the fight against ISIS. And Colombia and the FARC rebels sign a peace treaty ending a half-century-long guerrilla war. A panel of journalists joins guest host Derek McGinty for analysis of the week's top international news stories.

NPR

WhatsApp Will Start Sharing Data, Including Phone Numbers, With Facebook

It will also test new ways for businesses to communicate with users on the app. The privacy policy changes mark the long-expected move by Facebook to begin making money from the free app.

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