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Three Unions Approve Contracts With DCPS

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Three unions including those that represent principals, classroom aides and custodians have overwhelmingly approved agreements with D.C. Public Schools. If the D.C. Council signs off on the contracts, approximately 2,400 employees will receive more money.

More than 600 DCPS principals, assistant principals and master educators are represented by the Council of School Officers. They will receive a 2 percent raise, retroactive to October of last year. DCPS has also agreed to allow principals more say over school safety issues. There will be a task force created to discuss security staffing and scheduling as well as training on how to respond to dangerous situations.

The AFSCME Local 2921 contract, will affect the nearly 1,300 employees including classroom aides and front office workers, who will receive a 3 percent raise each year for four years. They will also receive a Metro pass each month.

And the Teamsters Local 639 reached an agreement on a new contract for almost 500 custodians and attendance counselors. Members will receive a 3 percent raise, retroactive to October 2013 through the 2017. Also, DCPS will contribute to a program that provides qualifying members financial assistance to buy a home in the District.

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