Brown On Final Stretch Of Campaign: 'Avoid Complacency' | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Brown On Final Stretch Of Campaign: 'Avoid Complacency'

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Maryland Democratic gubernatorial candidate, Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown, greets people onstage after participating in a Maryland Democratic primary gubernatorial debate at the University of Maryland in College Park, Md., Wednesday, May 7, 2014. 
(AP Photo/The Washington Post, Sarah L. Voisin, Pool)
Maryland Democratic gubernatorial candidate, Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown, greets people onstage after participating in a Maryland Democratic primary gubernatorial debate at the University of Maryland in College Park, Md., Wednesday, May 7, 2014. 

In the final week of campaigning, Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown's mantra is: avoid complacency.

"So it's constantly reminding folks: 'Hey look we have work to do,'" Brown says. "There are a lot of Marylanders who still have not heard the message. Who still want to be in the conversation with us about what the plans are, and the ideas, and things we are going to do to build a better Maryland."

The most recent polls from The Washington Post and Baltimore Sun show Brown with double digit leads over his two competitors — Attorney General Doug Gansler and Montgomery County Del. Heather Mizeur — for the Democratic nomination.

His status as the frontrunner has meant a lot of attacks from Gansler over Brown's role overseeing the rollout of the Affordable Care Act in Maryland. In particular, the health exchange website Maryland set up which performed so badly it had to be replaced. Brown has given many reasons as to why the website failed, but they ultimately boil down to one.

"We simply went with the wrong vendors. We chose a set of vendors differently from what Connecticut selected. They went with Deloitte Consulting. As did Kentucky, both of the best performing state websites. We chose vendors that included IBM. Go figure, a household name in technology and they simply didn't perform as contracted," Brown says.

Maryland eventually decided to switch to the technology Connecticut uses — a black eye for a heavily Democratic state whose leaders have been some of the biggest cheerleaders for President Obama's health law. But nearly all of those leaders have decided to endorse Brown and not Gansler, and along with the poll numbers, Brown thinks maybe the fury over the rollout of the law is beginning to wane.

"What Marylanders have very little patience for are leaders who are standing on the sidelines and complaining and carping for political gain. We chose to roll up our sleeves and get the job done," Brown says.

Brown's running mate is Ken Ulman, who's finishing his second term as Howard County executive and considered his own gubernatorial run before accepting the number two slot on Brown's ticket.

Brown also weighed in on some other questions:

For more information and to check out our Voter Guide, WAMU.org/Vote.

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