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'Deep Throat' Parking Garage In Arlington To Be Razed

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The plaque that stands outside the parking garage at Wilson Boulevard and North Nash Street in Rosslyn. (Ron Cogswell/Flickr)

The Arlington County Board has voted to demolish a building and parking garage containing one of the most historic sites of the past 50 years.

The board voted unanimously this weekend to raze the parking garage where FBI agent Mark Felt met secretly with Washington Post reporter Bob Woodward during the Watergate investigation. Felt, unknown by his real name for decades, was referred to by Woodward and partner Carl Bernstein as "Deep Throat.''

In all, officials with Monday Properties say they plan to replace their two 12-story buildings at 1401 Wilson Boulevard in Rosslyn with a 28-story residential tower and a 24-story commercial building. The existing structures and underground garage will be razed no sooner than January 2017.

The county plans to save the historical plaque installed in 2011 to mark the information exchange events which led to the resignation of president Richard Nixon, and the landowner pledges to create a memorial to the history of the Watergate investigation.


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