In Maryland Races, Latest Poll Results May Not Tell The Whole Story | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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In Maryland Races, Latest Poll Results May Not Tell The Whole Story

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In Maryland, polls this week show the Democratic primary for governor opening up, while the one for attorney general tightening. But there's a question of whether those poll numbers will hold up.

The Washington Post poll on the gubernatorial primary showed Lieutenant Governor Anthony Brown doubling up on his two opponents, while Baltimore County delegate Jon Cardin saw his lead shrink to inside the poll's margin of error in the attorney general's race.

Early voting has already started in Maryland, with the primary just 11 days away on June 24. Candidates are kicking into their final push, and for attorney general Doug Gansler, that means ignoring this week's poll showing him trailing by 23 percent in the Democratic race for governor.

Appearing on WAMU's Politics Hour, Gansler took heart in an election result in neighboring Virginia:

"The polls are obviously irrelevant in this election. We just saw Eric Cantor—the Washington Post had him up 34 points 10 days ahead, and the only question in the article was whether he'd win by more than 20 [percent] or not. And he lost by 12. So they were 46 percent off."

Montgomery County Delegate Heather Mizeur received 16 percent of the vote in the Post poll on the Democratic gubernatorial primary, which surveyed around 500 registered party voters.

Meanwhile in the Attorney General's race, Cardin's once-large lead has shrunk to just six percent over Montgomery County Senator Brian Frosh, with Prince George's County Delegate Aisha Braveboy trailing both. But the margin of error for that poll is seven percentage points, and more than 40 percent of those polled are still undecided.

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