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Public Input Sought On Proposed Dulles Access Highway

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Members of the public questioned officials on proposals for a highway on the western side of the Dulles International Airport and public meetings last year.
Martin Di Caro/WAMU
Members of the public questioned officials on proposals for a highway on the western side of the Dulles International Airport and public meetings last year.

The Loudoun County Board of Supervisors wants to hear from the public tonight about a controversial highway plan.

So many residents have spoken out against the Virginia Department of Transportation's plan to build express lanes in the median of Rt. 50 west of Dulles Airport that the Loudoun County Board of Supervisors is holding what it calls a "public input session" at Briar Woods High School. People are worried how a new highway corridor would affect traffic in and access to their neighborhoods.

Chris Miller is the president of the Piedmont Environmental Council, a group that usually finds itself at odds with VDOT's road building plans.

"We think there are a lot of other things that need to be fixed before you start focusing on access to a part of Dulles Airport that doesn't actually have any activity," Miller says.

Tom Fahrney is VDOT's project manager. He says there is a reason why the plan is called the Dulles Air Cargo, Passenger, and Metro Access Highway.

"To enhance access of future movement of people, passenger services, and air cargo traffic to Dulles Airport, knowing that Dulles Airport has a plan to provide a western access point," Fahrney says.

This highway would also connect to the northern end of the planned Bi-County Parkway. Funding decisions for both roads are at least one year away.

The public input session takes place Monday at 7 p.m.

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