WAMU 88.5 : News

Maryland Immigrant Advocacy Organization Endorses Brown, Frosh

Play associated audio
Case De Action unveiled their endorsements for the Democratic primary on Wednesday.
Matt Bush/WAMU
Case De Action unveiled their endorsements for the Democratic primary on Wednesday.

Casa De Action — the political arm of the top immigrant advocacy organization in Maryland — made its endorsements for statewide offices and county executive and council seats in Montgomery and Prince George's Counties on Wednesday.

Anthony Brown got the group's nod for governor and Brian Frosh for attorney general. The rest of the endorsements went heavy for incumbents, who have helped immigrant supporters notch many victories in Maryland the past decade.

Gustavo Torres, the group's executive director , says one measure in particular dictated their support for General Assembly candidates.

"The Trust Act, which is to make sure the police do not collaborate with [federal immigration authorities] to deport people who do not have criminal records. That is very essential," he says.

Torres expects the measure to be introduced during next year's session of the General Assembly.

Other issues important to the group include rent stabilization. Torres says many who live along areas where the Purple Line will be built fear that once that happens the cost of living there will skyrocket forcing them to move.

"We support the Purple Line. But for us it's very important that we have a compact because we don't want displacement of these families who have fought for many many years to make sure we have a Purple Line," Torres says.

Nowhere is that more apparent than just outside of Casa's Langley Park headquarters, where a sizable immigrant community lives just off of University Boulevard along where the Purple Line will one day run. But rent stabilization bills have had little success in the General Assembly in recent years.

NPR

Opulent And Apolitical: The Art Of The Met's Islamic Galleries

Navina Haidar, an Islamic art curator at the Met, says she isn't interested in ideology: "The only place where we allow ourselves any passion is in the artistic joy ... of something that's beautiful."
NPR

Tired Of The Seoul-Sucking Rat Race, Koreans Flock To Farming

More than 80 percent of people in South Korea live in cities. But in the past few years, there has been a shift. Tens of thousands of South Koreans are relocating to the countryside each year.
WAMU 88.5

Virginia Republicans Warn Of High Energy Costs With Obama's 'Clean Power Plan'

Republican leaders in Virginia say Obama's clean energy plan would drive up energy costs and damage a struggling economy. Democrats say saving the planet is more important than the short-term problem of higher energy bills.
NPR

Hope Or Hype: The Revolution In Africa Will Be Wireless

Young entrepreneurs in Africa say that they're leading a tech movement from the ground up. They think technology can solve social ills. But critics wonder if digital fixes can make a dent.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.