Maryland Immigrant Advocacy Organization Endorses Brown, Frosh | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Maryland Immigrant Advocacy Organization Endorses Brown, Frosh

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Case De Action unveiled their endorsements for the Democratic primary on Wednesday.
Matt Bush/WAMU
Case De Action unveiled their endorsements for the Democratic primary on Wednesday.

Casa De Action — the political arm of the top immigrant advocacy organization in Maryland — made its endorsements for statewide offices and county executive and council seats in Montgomery and Prince George's Counties on Wednesday.

Anthony Brown got the group's nod for governor and Brian Frosh for attorney general. The rest of the endorsements went heavy for incumbents, who have helped immigrant supporters notch many victories in Maryland the past decade.

Gustavo Torres, the group's executive director , says one measure in particular dictated their support for General Assembly candidates.

"The Trust Act, which is to make sure the police do not collaborate with [federal immigration authorities] to deport people who do not have criminal records. That is very essential," he says.

Torres expects the measure to be introduced during next year's session of the General Assembly.

Other issues important to the group include rent stabilization. Torres says many who live along areas where the Purple Line will be built fear that once that happens the cost of living there will skyrocket forcing them to move.

"We support the Purple Line. But for us it's very important that we have a compact because we don't want displacement of these families who have fought for many many years to make sure we have a Purple Line," Torres says.

Nowhere is that more apparent than just outside of Casa's Langley Park headquarters, where a sizable immigrant community lives just off of University Boulevard along where the Purple Line will one day run. But rent stabilization bills have had little success in the General Assembly in recent years.

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