Sailor Killed By Gunman On Navy Destroyer Honored Today | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Sailor Killed By Gunman On Navy Destroyer Honored Today

Vice Adm. William F. Moran, left, presents a flag to Sharon Blair, mother of U.S. Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Mark Mayo, of Hagerstown, Md., during a burial service at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Va., Friday, April 25, 2014.
(AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)
Vice Adm. William F. Moran, left, presents a flag to Sharon Blair, mother of U.S. Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Mark Mayo, of Hagerstown, Md., during a burial service at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Va., Friday, April 25, 2014.

A sailor slain by a gunman aboard a docked Navy destroyer is being honored at a Memorial Day ceremony near Baltimore.

The annual event at Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens in Timonium is paying tribute Monday to Petty Officer 2nd Class Mark Mayo of Hagerstown.

The 24-year-old sailor was shot when he dove between another sailor and a civilian truck driver who had seized her gun aboard the ship docked in Norfolk, Virginia, March 24.

Mayo's remains were buried last month at Arlington National Cemetery.

NPR

Rosh Hashana's Sacred Bread Offers Meaning In Many Shapes And Sizes

Making challah for the Jewish New Year lets the baker take a moment to reflect on life's blessings. The bread can be shaped into the traditional round, or a lion or bird to echo Bible verses.
NPR

Rosh Hashana's Sacred Bread Offers Meaning In Many Shapes And Sizes

Making challah for the Jewish New Year lets the baker take a moment to reflect on life's blessings. The bread can be shaped into the traditional round, or a lion or bird to echo Bible verses.
NPR

More Americans Favor Mixing Religion And Politics, Survey Says

The poll by Pew's Religion & Public Life Project also shows that three-quarters of survey participants believe religion's influence on American life is waning.
NPR

Seeking Frugal Tech Solutions For Nairobi's Jammed Traffic

Traffic in major cities in the developing world can be a mind-numbing mess. A team at IBM in Kenya's capitol thinks it's found an answer.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.