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Metro To Eliminate Paper Fare Cards

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Metro plans to phase out paper fare cards over the next two years as it modernizes its fare vending machines.
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Metro plans to phase out paper fare cards over the next two years as it modernizes its fare vending machines.

Metro is going to do away with the paper fare cards few riders use anymore.

The folks most likely to gripe about the end of paper fare cards—are the fewer than 10 percent of all Metrorail riders who still use them, like tourists and out-of-towners.

"It's very annoying. I am from New York and I come here for business and I have one of these and I always leave it back in New York," says Metro passenger Mitch Rothenberg. He says he leaves his SmarTrip card back in New York, so he has to keep buying paper fare cards with the $1 per ride surcharge every time he's back in D.C. on business. A SmarTrip card costs $2.

"I'd have to buy a new one every single time because I am from out of town," Rothenberg says. Maybe he should bring the SmarTrip card he has, suggests a reporter. His response: "If I remember it."

Metro will phase out paper fare cards over the next two years as it modernizes more than 500 fare vending machines.

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