NPR : News

Obama Sanctions Individuals In Central African Republic

President Obama has issued an executive order authorizing sanctions against five people in the Central African Republican in connection with the country's sectarian conflict.

In a statement, the White House cited "[escalating] violence and human rights abuses," and noted that "[communities] that have lived together peacefully for generations are being torn apart along sectarian lines."

The president's executive order "imposes sanctions on five individuals – sending a powerful message that impunity will not be tolerated and that those who threaten the stability of the CAR will face consequences."

Reuters reports that the individuals include former CAR President Francois Bozize and four other men linked to violence and human rights abuses in the country.

"Also sanctioned were Nourredine Adam, a former minister of public security, and Levy Yakete, an 'anti-balaka' [anti-machete] Christian militia leader. Bozize, Adam and Yakete were blacklisted by the United Nations on Friday."

(The anti-balaka militia, "are a loosely organized ground made up of Christians and animists opposed to [Muslim] Seleka rule in Central African Republic," writes The Guardian.)

Reuters says:

"The United States also sanctioned Michel Djotodia, former transitional president of the Central African Republic and leader of the Seleka rebellion, and Abdoulaye Miskine, leader of the Democratic Front of the Central African Republic People."

The sanctions come on the same day that French officials confirmed that 26-year-old photojournalist Camille Lepage had been killed while covering the conflict in CAR.

The French freelancer, whose work was published in major French newspapers as well as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post and The Los Angeles Times, was found dead "by French peacekeepers inside a vehicle driven by Christian militia fighters, according to a French statement cited by AP.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit


'Steve Jobs': As Ambitious As Its Title Character

Danny Boyle's new biopic, Steve Jobs, is a look at the man who made Apple mean computers, not fruit. NPR film critic Bob Mondello says it's an invigorating story told in three acts of crisis.

Could A Mushroom Save The Honeybee?

The bees that pollinate crops are on the brink of collapse. One big reason why: a virus-carrying mite. Now, researchers think a rare fungi could boost bees' immune system and attack the mite itself.

Hillary Clinton Holds 'Tough, Candid' Meeting With Black Lives Matter Activists

NPR's Kelly McEvers speaks with DeRay McKesson of the group, "We The Protesters," about the meeting with presidential candidate Hillary Clinton in Washington, D.C., Friday.

Volkswagen Faces Uphill Battle In Repairing Tarnished Reputation

Volkswagen faces two enormous repair jobs: fixing its polluting diesel cars and its battered reputation. Both may be much harder to fix than anything other scandal-plagued car companies have faced.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.