Judge Strikes Down Idaho's Same-Sex Marriage Ban | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

NPR : News

Filed Under:

Judge Strikes Down Idaho's Same-Sex Marriage Ban

A federal judge has struck down Idaho's ban on gay marriage.

U.S. District Magistrate Judge Candy Dale ruled Tuesday that the state's law banning same-sex marriage is unconstitutional and that Idaho must allow gay couples to marry as soon as 9 a.m. Friday

"Idaho's Marriage Laws withhold from them a profound and personal choice, one that most can take for granted," Dale wrote in a 57-page decision.

"Idaho's Marriage Laws withhold from them a profound and personal choice, one that most can take for granted," she wrote.

Gov. Butch Otter has said he will appeal the case. On Monday, he filed a pre-emptive motion for a stay in case the state lost, according to the Idaho Statesman.

"Today's decision, while disappointing, is a small setback in a long-term battle that will end at the U.S. Supreme Court," Otter said in a statement. "I am firmly committed to upholding the will of the people and defending our Constitution."

Idaho is the second state in the space of a week to have its same-sex marriage ban wiped out by the court. More than 200 gay couples have obtained licenses in Arkansas since a judge struck down a ban in that state on Friday, reports the Associated Press.

Judges in Michigan, Oklahoma, Texas, Utah and Virginia have struck down their state bans, wrote Krishnadev Calamur for the Two-Way Blog last week.

An appeals court in Virginia heard emotional arguments earlier Tuesday questioning whether marriage is a fundamental right in its review of a February decision overturning the state's ban.

Whichever way that court rules, writes Robert Barnes in the Washington Post, "the judges acknowledged that the work they and other appeals court judges around the country are doing is probably just teeing up the issue for the Supreme Court."

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Investigating The Drug Trade In 'Cartel Land'

A new documentary tells a riveting story of the way power and violence intersect along the Arizona border and in embattled Michoacan, Mexico.
NPR

Why The World Might Be Running Out Of Cocoa Farmers

West African cocoa farmers earn less than $1 a day. Those low wages could jeopardize the future of chocolate labor, as young farmers find better opportunities to earn a living, a new report warns.
NPR

Donald Trump Controversy Highlights Influence Of Hispanics In U.S.

NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with Felix Sanchez, chairman and co-founder of the National Hispanic Foundation for the Arts, about Republican presidential candidate Trump's remarks on Mexican immigrants.
NPR

Pilot In Solar-Powered Plane Sets Aviation Record

André Borschberg, flying Solar Impulse 2, set a new record of 120 hours in the cockpit on a journey from Japan to Hawaii.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.