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See A Cone, Drop The Phone, Campaign Urges Virginia Drivers

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A new campaign urges Virginia drivers to navigate cautiously through highway work zones.
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A new campaign urges Virginia drivers to navigate cautiously through highway work zones.

In Virginia, drivers are being asked to keep their hands on the wheel and off their phones this summer.

For nearly 30 miles between Fairfax and Stafford Counties, the 95 Express Lanes are under construction—and will be until early next year. So today at a news conference along the construction zone, officials launched the "Orange Cones, No Phones" awareness campaign.

AAA's Lon Anderson says it's a plea to motorists to pay attention to the road, not their phones. "We've got 1,500 workers out there, some of them only inches from the traffic whizzing past them," Anderson says. "We really need to realize that driving through these work zones is really tough."

AAA released a survey that found the number of frequent 95 drivers likely to use their cell phone while driving has increased from 56 to 62 percent.

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