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House Moves Forward On Creation Of National Women's History Museum In D.C.

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Lawmakers have revived a long-stalled effort to create a National Women's History Museum in the nation's capital.

The Republican-controlled House voted 383-33 on Wednesday to create a commission to study the feasibility of a museum on the National Mall. A similar measure is pending in the Senate.

Congress has allowed previous legislation calling for a women's museum to die at least twice since 2005.

Republican Rep. Marsha Blackburn of Tennessee and Democratic Rep. Carolyn Maloney of New York said the contributions of women have been mostly left out of museums, statues and national landmarks. They say a museum would teach the history of more than half the U.S. population.

Republican Rep. Michele Bachmann of Minnesota spoke against the bill. She says the museum concept "will enshrine the radical feminist movement.''

The bill may be one of the few things Republicans and Democrats can agree on lately, drawing support from leaders of both parties.

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