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Bowser Advocates For Cutting Drunk Driving Standard In Half

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The current limit for drunk driving in D.C. is .08, but Muriel Bowser wants to drop it to .05.
The current limit for drunk driving in D.C. is .08, but Muriel Bowser wants to drop it to .05.

Muriel Bowser, D.C.'s Democratic nominee for mayor, wants to cut the legal limit for drunken driving nearly in half.

On Tuesday, Bowser introduced a bill that calls for the city to make a blood-alcohol concentration of .05 percent the legal threshold for drunken driving. The current limit is .08 percent in the District and all 50 states.

The National Transportation Safety Board recommended nearly a year ago that states lower their limits, saying that amount of alcohol significantly increases the risk of an accident. More than 100 countries have adopted the .05 standard.

Bowser says “the District can lead on this issue," but the anti-drunk driving group Mothers Against Drunk Driving said last year that setting the standard lower won't be enough.

She defeated Mayor Vincent Gray in last month’s Democratic primary, and will likely face Council member David Catania (I-At Large) in November's general election.

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