Ukraine: Pro-Russia Crowd Surrounds Police Station In Odessa | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

NPR : News

Filed Under:

Ukraine: Pro-Russia Crowd Surrounds Police Station In Odessa

Urging the release of separatists detained during Friday's unrest that left dozens dead, more than 100 pro-Russia activists surrounded a police station in the southern Ukrainian port city of Odessa Sunday.

Update at 4:30 p.m. ET: More Activists Released

Police in Odessa say 67 pro-Russia activists were freed Sunday.

CNN quotes the Ukrainian Interior Ministry's website:

"Based on the decision taken by Odessa's regional prosecutor's office and due to the demands of the protesters, 67 people previously detained for participating in mass disturbances on May 2nd in Odessa were released Sunday."

Our original post continues:

From the BBC:

"The initially peaceful rally turned violent as protesters - some wearing masks and carrying improvised weapons - broke windows and forced the gates.

"Several detained protesters were released by the police. There were chants of 'Russia, Russia' from the crowds."

The standoff comes two days after dozens of people died in a fire that followed a clash between pro-Ukraine and pro-Russia groups on Friday. The region's police chief was fired after that incident; the police agency is being investigated.

Today, interim Ukrainian Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk visited Odessa and called the deaths a "tragedy for all Ukraine."

The site of the deadly fire has drawn tributes this weekend, as people piled flowers around candles and photographs to honor those who died.

Here are other developments in the Ukraine crisis:

-- Yatsenyuk says the government in Kiev will decentralize power and provide "additional guarantees concerning the use of the Russian language and other languages." (Russia's state-run Tass news agency)

-- Continuing its military operations against separatists, Ukraine's forces "destroyed pro-Russian rebel checkpoints" in Kramatorsk and Slovyansk. (Kyiv Post)

-- Russia and Ukraine are blaming each other for Friday's violence. (Euronews)

-- Ukraine's government is getting advice from U.S. agents of the CIA and FBI, according to a German newspaper. (Global Post)

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

As Summer Winds Down, Wistful Dreams Of A 'Lost Estate'

The scent of fresh pencils is in the air, and homework assignments are around the corner. In honor of back-to-school season, author Alexander Aciman recommends The Lost Estate by Henri Alain-Fournier.
NPR

A Food Crisis Follows Africa's Ebola Crisis

Food shortages are emerging in the wake of West Africa's Ebola epidemic. Market shelves are bare and fields are neglected because traders can't move and social gatherings are discouraged.
WAMU 88.5

McDonnell Corruption Trial: Former Gov Defends Relationship With Jonnie Williams

On the stand today, the former Virginia governor defended his relationship with the businessman at the heart of the trial, saying it was appropriate.
NPR

Coming Soon To A Pole Near You: A Bike That Locks Itself

Cyclists may soon have a convenient way to discourage bike thieves, thanks to new designs that use parts of the bikes themselves as locks.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.