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In Wake Of Clippers Controversy, More Calls For Change Of Redskins Name

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The NBA’s decision to ban Los Angeles Clipper’s owner Donald Sterling for racist remarks is renewing focus on the controversy surrounding Washington's football team's name.

The ongoing debate over whether the Washington Redskins should change its team name — which some consider to be offensive to Native Americans — is heating up following NBA commissioner Adam Silver's decision to ban Sterling for life.

Senator Harry Reid of Nevada took to the Senate floor yesterday, calling on NFL commissioner Roger Goodell to take action.

“Remove this hateful term from your league’s vocabulary. Follow the NBA’s example and rid the league of bigotry and racism. Your fans will support it," he said.

D.C.’s delegate to Capitol Hill, Eleanor Holmes Norton, echoed similar remarks. She says Goodell must not, in her words, “be seen kicking and screaming to rid the league of a team name that carries racist and demeaning connotations from a bygone era.”

Earlier this year, Goodell told reporters that while he knows many disagree with the name, he feels its honorable to Native Americans. The owner of Washington’s football team, Dan Snyder, has said he will never change the name.


No Meekness Here: Meet Rosa Parks, 'Lifelong Freedom Fighter'

As the 60th anniversary of the historic Montgomery Bus Boycott approaches, author Jeanne Theoharis says it's time to let go of the image of Rosa Parks as an unassuming accidental activist.

Internet Food Culture Gives Rise To New 'Eatymology'

Internet food culture has brought us new words for nearly every gastronomical condition. The author of "Eatymology," parodist Josh Friedland, discusses "brogurt" with NPR's Rachel Martin.
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World Leaders Meet For The UN Climate Change Summit In Paris

World leaders meet for the UN climate change summit in Paris to discuss plans for reducing carbon emissions. What's at stake for the talks, and prospects for a major agreement.


What Is Li-Fi And When Will You Use It To Download Everything Faster?

Li-Fi is a lot like Wi-Fi, but it uses light to transmit data. NPR's Scott Simon speaks to the man who invented the faster alternative: Harald Haas.

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