D.C. Campaign Signs Must Come Down Today, Or Else | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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D.C. Campaign Signs Must Come Down Today, Or Else

A sign for Jack Evans along Connecticut Avenue NW was removed shortly after this photo was taken.
Andrew Katz-Moses/WAMU
A sign for Jack Evans along Connecticut Avenue NW was removed shortly after this photo was taken.

This post has been updated.

The District can start handing out fines today for any campaign signs from April's primary left on the street.

Looking around Washington, it appears there is still a primary going on, with campaign signs for mayor and Council members still up all over the city. As of today, the District can fine primary campaigns for not removing those signs.

Mark Rosen lives in the area and wants to see them gone.

"I just think it’s litter. I don't like litter, it should be cleaned up," Rosen says.

Council member Jack Evans (D-Ward 2) says his campaign put up 10,000 signs for the primary and is working hard to comply with the regulations.

"We're pulling them down as fast as we can. We've been working since the day after the elections to pull them down," Evans says. "So what I'm encouraging everyone to do is call my office here whenever you see a sign anywhere and we will get somebody out there to pull it down."

Alternatively, if you'd like to report a campaign sign that's still up past the May 1 deadline, you can call 311 to send a DPW investigator to see if a citation is appropriate.

The fines range from $150 on the first offense to $2,000 on the fourth offense. Campaign signs for November's general election can stay up, though D.C. regulations limit them to 180 days.

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