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Nearly Half Of Maryland Residents Say They Would Move Elsewhere

Pack up the moving truck, hon.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/hjl/38972645/
Pack up the moving truck, hon.

There's plenty to do in Maryland, but apparently not enough to motivate close to half of the state's residents to stay put.

A new Gallup poll finds that 47 percent of Marylanders say they would move to another state if given the chance, trailing only Illinois and Connecticut in terms of residents' desire to hightail it elsewhere. Fifty-one percent of Marylanders say they would stay.

Thirty-seven percent of Virginia residents expressed a similar desire to move to another state, while the national average stood at 33 percent. Residents of Maine, Montana and Hawaii showed the most pride: only 23 percent of them said they would leave if offered the chance.

The poll also found that 17 percent of current Maryland residents would leave the state within the next 12 months, trailing Nevada (20 percent), Illinois (19 percent) and Arizona (19 percent).

Of the group saying they would be leaving, 17 percent cited work reasons, and 17 percent said it was family and friends motivating the move. Thirteen percent pointed to weather and location, eight percent said taxes, seven percent said it was quality of life, seven percent cited cost of living, and six percent schools.

The poll surveyed roughly 600 residents per state between June and December 2013. It has a margin of error of plus or minus five percent.

Last year, the Tax Foundation reported that only seven states lost more taxable income than Maryland between 2000 and 2010. The loss of revenue was estimated at $330 million.

According to data on mobility from the U.S. Census, in 2010 Maryland lost more residents than it gained, for a net less of just over 11,000 residents. Virginia, by comparison, gained over 27,000.

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