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Accused Accomack Arsonist To Get Multiple Days In Court

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An Accomack County judge has rejected prosecutors’ request to hold a single trial for Tonya Bundick, who is facing 62 arson charges. She may not get 62 different days in court, but it’s clear she will at least have more than one.

Prosecutors had asked Circuit Court Judge Glen A. Tyler to hold a single trial for Bundick, the woman accused of setting multiple arson fires on Virginia’s Eastern Shore with her fiancé Charles R Smith III.

But Judge Tyler denied that request and said in his order that the charges against Bundick aren't based on the same act and that there’s no common scheme or plan.

The 77 total arson fires took place over a 134 day period last year, and prosecutors argued that there were common links in the crimes that would constitute a single trial, but the judge ruled that justice requires separate trials.

Smith pled guilty to 67 of his 68 charges and is now awaiting sentencing. He faces more than 500 years in prison.

Bundick, on the other hand, submitted an Alford Plea on her two original arson charges back in January.

Bundick’s attorney’s had also motioned to have her upcoming trials moved away from Accomack County, but Judge Tyler declined to rule on that motion, calling it premature.

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