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Three McAuliffe Vetoes Confirmed In Virginia Senate

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Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe, gestures after signing a proclamation for a special session in the Governors conference room at the Capitol in Richmond, Va., Saturday, March 8, 2014.
(AP Photo/Steve Helber)
Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe, gestures after signing a proclamation for a special session in the Governors conference room at the Capitol in Richmond, Va., Saturday, March 8, 2014.

Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe is successfully vetoing two religious expression bills and legislation that would have granted people who receive red-light tickets the right to contest citations in circuit court.

The Virginia Senate is upholding McAuliffe's vetoes during a one-day legislative meeting commonly referred to as the "veto session."

McAuliffe had vetoed a bill that would have codified a student's right to pray at school. Another would have prohibited censorship of sermons given by chaplains of the Virginia National Guard.

The American Civil Liberties Union of Virginia is praising the Senate's votes, while the conservative Family Foundation is condemning them.

The General Assembly did not take up the state's proposed $96 billion two-year budget. Republicans and Democrats remain deadlocked on whether the budget should include expanding Medicaid eligibility.

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