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Suspects Sought In Brookland Burglary

D.C. police have released sketches of two of three suspects sought in a Brookland burglary.
Metropolitan Police Department
D.C. police have released sketches of two of three suspects sought in a Brookland burglary.

D.C. police are looking for three men who robbed eight Catholic University students at gunpoint after tying them up with zip-ties in a home in Northeast D.C.

Police say one student was leaving a group home on the 3300 block of Seventh Street NE when a gunman forced him back inside. Then two other gunmen came in and zip-tied the hands of the students before stealing money and their cell phones. The armed robbery occurred on April 4.

Police are asking for the public's help to identify the suspects, and they have released sketches of two of them.

Police describe the three suspects as follows:

Suspect One: Black male, approximately 6'00" in height, dark complexion, dark sweatshirt, thin build, in his twenties, armed with a long gun (possibly an assault rifle).

Suspect Two: Black male, approximately 6'00" in height, light complexion, thin build, with braids or dreadlocks, in his twenties, armed with a semi-automatic handgun.

Suspect Three: Black male, approximately 5'10" in height, light complexion, medium build, with short hair and a mustache, approximately 30 years old, armed with a semi-automatic handgun.

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