Yes, It Is A Crime To Curse At Someone In Virginia — Just Ask This Guy | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Yes, It Is A Crime To Curse At Someone In Virginia — Just Ask This Guy

In Virginia, you better watch your language.
Sandra Cuccia: http://www.flickr.com/photos/cuccia/4533513614
In Virginia, you better watch your language.

Cursing at a public official in Virginia isn't polite, nor is it legally sound. The Richmond Times-Dispatch reports that a man has been fined for leaving a profane voicemail for Attorney General Mark Herring:

A Yorktown man was fined $250 Monday after pleading guilty to calling Attorney General Mark R. Herring’s public comment line and leaving a message with profane language on the voicemail because of Herring’s support of same-sex marriage.

And if you're curious, it is indeed a crime to curse at someone in the commonwealth:

If any person shall, in the presence or hearing of another, curse or abuse such other person, or use any violent abusive language to such person concerning himself or any of his relations, or otherwise use such language, under circumstances reasonably calculated to provoke a breach of the peace, he shall be guilty of a Class 3 misdemeanor.

A spokesman for Herring told the Times-Dispatch that the message it received from James Timothy Berry was "extremely vulgar and profane and ended in a veiled threat."

D.C. prohibits "abusive or offensive language or gestures" in its broader disorderly conduct law, but those words or gestures would have to be so severe as to "provoke immediate physical retaliation or violence."

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