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Helen Hayes Awards Celebrate Local Theater Talent

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Twenty-nine honors were presented last night during the 30th Annual Helen Hayes Awards. It's one of the most anticipating nights in D.C. theater, and the most prestigious theater award ceremony in the District.

Local director and playwright Aaron Posner received multiple nominations for his work. His play "Stupid F---ing Bird," which was staged at Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company, received both the Helen Hayes Award for Outstanding Resident Play and The Charles MacArthur Award for Outstanding New Play or Musical.

"The Helen Hayes are a chance to help people understand that what's happening here is as good as anything that's happening anywhere, and that you don't have to go to New York and that it's not about stuff being brought in," Posner said. "It's stuff being made here by local artists for local audiences that really counts."

The Helen Hayes Awards come on the heels of theatreWeek, a promotional campaign that aims to turn the spotlight on local, professional theater through special events, ticket giveaways and discounted performances.

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