NPR : News

Netflix Says It Will Raise New Customer Subscription Rates

Netflix, buoyed by its foray into original productions such as the political drama House of Cards, said Monday it has added 2.25 million new customers and plans to raise its new-subscriptions rate by $1 or $2 a month.

The video streaming service reported first quarter earnings of $53 million, or 86 cents a share. Its share price surged by 6 percent following the announcement of earnings that compared with $2.7 million in the same period a year ago.

Chief Executive Reed Hastings said Netflix had improved its selection of television shows and movies and, with higher revenue from the raising the price of new subscriptions, "we will be able to license much more content and deliver it in very high quality video," he said on a webcast, according to Reuters.

In a quarterly letter to shareholders, Netflix said it plans to impose "a one or two dollar increase, depending on the country, later this quarter for new members only."

In recent years, Netflix has ventured into producing original series to attract new subscriptions, with the acclaimed House of Cards, starring Kevin Spacey, and Orange is the New Black among them.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit


French Bulldog At Heart Of New Children's Book 'Naughty Mabel'

Mabel is a naughty French bulldog at the center of a new children's book by Nathan Lane and Devlin Elliott. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Lane about his inspiration for the fictional dog.

How Do We Get To Love At 'First Bite'?

It's the season of food, and British food writer Bee Wilson has a book on how our food tastes are formed. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with her about her new book, "First Bite: How We Learn to Eat."

Snapshots 2016: Trump's Message Resonates With A Master Cabinet Maker

From time to time during this election season we'll be introducing you to ordinary people that our reporters meet out on the campaign trail. Today: a snapshot from a Donald Trump rally in New Hampshire.

What Is Li-Fi And When Will You Use It To Download Everything Faster?

Li-Fi is a lot like Wi-Fi, but it uses light to transmit data. NPR's Scott Simon speaks to the man who invented the faster alternative: Harald Haas.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.