WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

D.C. Special Education Advocates Optimistic About Extra Funds For Students

Play associated audio

Special education advocates for D.C.’s public school children say they are “cautiously optimistic” that more money proposed in the budget for students will disabilities will translate into better care.

Judith Sandalow with Children’s Law Center in D.C. says the overall budget for children with special needs is smaller because of lower enrollment projections.

But the money available for each child is expected to increase from between $80 dollars to $550 dollars, depending on the child's needs. Sandalow says these additional funds will be spent increasing the number of special education teachers, more professional development and hiring paraprofessionals including occupational therapists.

"For the first time, to my knowledge, the D.C. public schools aiming to move students up more than one grade level in a year," she says.

Sandalow says other areas DCPS should invest in include more money to evaluate children with special needs who are younger than 5 years old and to help older students with disabilities prepare for vocational and independent living. Just 18 percent of DCPS students in special education can read at grade level and 21 percent can do math.


In The 'Golden Age Of Television,' Advertising Intersects With Programming

NPR's Robert Siegel speaks with New Yorker television critic Emily Nussbaum about her essay on the new model of advertising in the so-called "golden age of television."

California City Orders Restaurants To Use Disposable Plates, Cups

Officials in Fort Bragg also ordered restaurants to serve water to customers only upon request. As part of a stage 3 water emergency, things like washing cars using city water are prohibited, too.

GOP Presidential Candidates Offer Varied Responses To Oregon Shooting

GOP presidential candidate Ben Carson says if he would have engaged the Orgeon shooter if he had been there, He isnt the only republican who has soken about guns recently,.

Why You Should Keep A Tighter Grip On Airline Boarding Passes

You might want to think twice before shoving that boarding pass into the seat pocket in front of you. Security reporter Brian Krebs says there could be sensitive information on it.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.