Ambiguities Abound With Maryland Marijuana Law | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Ambiguities Abound With Maryland Marijuana Law

Play associated audio
Possession of small amounts of marijuana may soon be decriminalized in Maryland, but not the paraphenalia used to consume it.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/l33tpwn3r/6764078833/
Possession of small amounts of marijuana may soon be decriminalized in Maryland, but not the paraphenalia used to consume it.

A new Maryland law that will decriminalize marijuana in October involves some ambiguities that police and prosecutors are just beginning to confront.

Under the law, possession of rolling papers, pipes and other marijuana accessories will remain a criminal offense, meaning a person could still be arrested for it.

Also, fines are supposed to go up for anyone caught with the drug more than once, but Scott Shellenberger, the state's attorney for Baltimore County, says it will be hard for police to establish whether a person has been charged before. Prior non-criminal offenses will not show up in the criminal database.

The Maryland State's Attorneys Association had urged Gov. Martin O'Malley to veto the bill because the bill did not maintain criminal penalties for possessing marijuana on school property.

O'Malley, who signed the bill into law Monday, says he hopes the law will improve public safety by freeing police officers to focus on more serious threats.

WAMU 88.5

For Anniversary Of President's Death, Ford's Theatre Focuses On Mrs. Lincoln

The very theater where President Lincoln was assassinated 150 years ago is remembering the woman who felt that great loss most accutely — The Widow Lincoln.

NPR

College Life Doesn't Have To Mean Crummy Cuisine, Says Dorm Room Chef

Sick of dining hall pizza, public health student Emily Hu taught herself how to cook — even with no oven. Now she's hoping to inspire her peers to pick up cooking skills and healthier eating habits.
NPR

Democrat Seeks To Authorize Operations Against ISIS

Rep. Adam Schiff of California plans to introduce a bill to allow congressional authorization of military operations against ISIS. NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Rep. Schiff about the new legislation.
NPR

In Sweden, Remote-Control Airport Is A Reality

Sweden is the first country in the world to use new technology to land passenger airplanes remotely. At an airport in a tiny town, flights are guided by operators sitting miles away.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.