Ambiguities Abound With Maryland Marijuana Law | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Ambiguities Abound With Maryland Marijuana Law

Play associated audio
Possession of small amounts of marijuana may soon be decriminalized in Maryland, but not the paraphenalia used to consume it.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/l33tpwn3r/6764078833/
Possession of small amounts of marijuana may soon be decriminalized in Maryland, but not the paraphenalia used to consume it.

A new Maryland law that will decriminalize marijuana in October involves some ambiguities that police and prosecutors are just beginning to confront.

Under the law, possession of rolling papers, pipes and other marijuana accessories will remain a criminal offense, meaning a person could still be arrested for it.

Also, fines are supposed to go up for anyone caught with the drug more than once, but Scott Shellenberger, the state's attorney for Baltimore County, says it will be hard for police to establish whether a person has been charged before. Prior non-criminal offenses will not show up in the criminal database.

The Maryland State's Attorneys Association had urged Gov. Martin O'Malley to veto the bill because the bill did not maintain criminal penalties for possessing marijuana on school property.

O'Malley, who signed the bill into law Monday, says he hopes the law will improve public safety by freeing police officers to focus on more serious threats.

WAMU 88.5

Art Beat With Lauren Landau, Oct. 21

From a culture battle to the Civil War, local theater takes on historic conflicts.
NPR

Sandwich Monday: The Primanti Bros. Pitts-burger

For this week's Sandwich Monday, we try a sandwich from the famous Primanti Bros. of Pittsburgh.
NPR

In Tight Races, Both Parties Bank On Early Votes

Two million people have already voted in next month's election, including President Obama. Locking in votes early is huge, particularly since control of the Senate rests in a handful of close races.
NPR

Tunisia's Emerging Tech Sector Hampered By Old Policies

When Tunisia's young people protested in 2011, they had one key demand: jobs. Now, despite new political leadership, that demand remains unmet — even in tech, the sector that offers the most promise.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.