Virginia Makes Birth Certificates Available At DMV | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Virginia Makes Birth Certificates Available At DMV

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Gov. Terry McAullife says Virginia is now making birth certificates accessible at DMV offices, something that was often difficult before.

Since March 1, more than 6,000 Virginians have requested birth certificates — and most left the DMV with copies in their hands. It took this long for the administration to make the announcement because officials wanted to make sure that all of the kinks were ironed out of the system that makes providing vital records possible.

State Health Commissioner Marissa Levine applauds the change, saying it's one less public health issue to worry about.

"Think about all the things particularly for parents who are trying to access schools, medical issues. It's a document that has significance, and the more we could make it more easily accessible to Virginians, the better off we'd all be," she says.

McAuliffe says this is a first step in creating one-stop shopping at DMV offices. He says by January 1 of next year residents will be able to get copies of marriage, divorce and death certificates.

Virginia has also joined the multi-state Electronic Verification of Vital Events network. The DMV can now verify a customer's birth record through databases in 31 states.

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