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High Turnover On Tap For Maryland Legislature

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The Maryland General Assembly adjourned for the year this week. When lawmakers convene next year in Annapolis, both branches will look much different.

It's an election year and all 47 seats in the Senate and 141 in the House are up for grabs. While many who hold those seats will be returned by voters this fall, some won't. Others cast their final votes on Monday and won't be returning on their own accord. The House will be affected by this more, as nearly a third of delegates from this year's session won't be back next year. Some are retiring, but just as many are running for other offices, including governor, lieutenant governor, attorney general, state senate, county executive, or county council.

House speaker Mike Busch says while it's a big number, turnover like this isn't unexpected. "Usually when a governor leaves at the end of a second term, you see a higher turnover," he says. "Forty-two is a lot of individuals to leave the House. But change is good, too."

Turnover in the Senate won't be as drastic, but some longtime senators did end their careers this week. Montgomery County Democrat Jennie Forehand is retiring, while Judicial Proceedings Committee chairman Brian Frosh is leaving to run for attorney general, and former Republican leader Allan Kittleman is campaigning to be Howard County executive.

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