NPR : News

Filed Under:

Nest Halts Sales Of Smoke Detector, Disables 'Wave' Feature

The Google-owned Nest Labs has halted sales of its smoke and carbon monoxide detectors, the company announced on its website.

In a letter from CEO Tony Fadell to customers, he said the company was concerned that users could unintentionally disable the device by waving their hands in front of it.

One of the device's most advertised features is that you could disable it with a wave in case you've burnt toast or something like that. The problem, he said, is under "a unique combination of circumstances" this could happen unintentionally.

"This could delay an alarm going off if there was a real fire," Fadell said. "We identified this problem ourselves and are not aware of any customers who have experienced this, but the fact that it could even potentially happen is extremely important to me and I want to address it immediately."

For now, the AP reports, Nest has pushed a software update to disable the wave feature on the devices. The company is halting sales to make sure all the devices have the updated software.

The AP adds:

"The Nest Protect costs about $130. In comparison, other smoke and carbon monoxide detectors typically range between $50 and $80. ...

"Consumers with a Nest Protect connected to a Nest account with Wi-Fi will automatically have Nest Wave disabled within 24 hours. No action needs to be taken and their smoke alarm will continue to work. Those with a Nest Protect not connected to a company account should immediately connect to their Nest account so the company can remotely disable Nest Wave.

"For individuals with a Nest Protect not connected to an account and that don't have access to Wi-Fi, Nest recommends that they immediately stop using the alarm and contact the company for a complete refund."

Nest was acquired by Google earlier this year. Google paid $3.2 billion.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit


No Meekness Here: Meet Rosa Parks, 'Lifelong Freedom Fighter'

As the 60th anniversary of the historic Montgomery Bus Boycott approaches, author Jeanne Theoharis says it's time to let go of the image of Rosa Parks as an unassuming accidental activist.

Internet Food Culture Gives Rise To New 'Eatymology'

Internet food culture has brought us new words for nearly every gastronomical condition. The author of "Eatymology," parodist Josh Friedland, discusses "brogurt" with NPR's Rachel Martin.
WAMU 88.5

World Leaders Meet For The UN Climate Change Summit In Paris

World leaders meet for the UN climate change summit in Paris to discuss plans for reducing carbon emissions. What's at stake for the talks, and prospects for a major agreement.


Payoffs For Prediction: Could Markets Help Identify Terrorism Risk?

In a terror prediction market, people would bet real money on the likelihood of attacks. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Stephen Carter about whether such a market could predict — and deter — attacks.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.