D.C. Failing To Properly Educate Adult Learners, Says Report | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

D.C. Failing To Properly Educate Adult Learners, Says Report

Play associated audio

D.C. is home to one of the most highly skilled labor markets in the country, yet more than 60,000 adults who live here cannot read and do math at a basic level. A new report by the non profit D.C. Appleseed urges District leaders to do more to help this struggling population.

Brooke DeRenzis, the author of the report, “From Basic Skills to Good Jobs,” says all the District agencies that educate adult learners only serve a fraction of the population that needs help.

"Together they served at most, roughly 8,000 residents in Fiscal Year 2013, the number of residents without a high school degree is over 60,000," she says.

DeRenzis says the educational outcomes for adult learners in D.C. lag behind the national outcomes.

"District adult learners are more likely to leave the program early, they also have lower levels of educational gains and a lower GED exam pass rate," she says, noting that there are several challenges.

"Many of the job training programs that are funded in the District of Columbia require adults to have skills at the eighth grade level, and over half of the D.C. adult learners enrolled in programs are below that level," she says.

And DeRenzis says funding is uneven. For example, an adult who studies at a charter school receives almost $7,000 from the D.C. government, while an adult who studies at a community non-profit receives only $800.

DeRenzis says one of the recommendations is that all agencies that work on adult education coordinate their work and create common goals.

The report also calls for two and a half million dollars of additional funding to pay for adult education programs to pay for additional professional development, testing out pilot programs and assessments for students with learning disabilities.

NPR

Join The 'Morning Edition' Book Club As We Read 'A God In Ruins'

Gone Girl author Gillian Flynn, who selected the book, tells NPR's David Greene that Kate Atkinson is "one of those writers that really can make you weep on one page and laugh on the next."
NPR

'Bourbon Empire' Reveals The Smoke And Mirrors Of American Whiskey

A new book suggests that tall tales on craft bourbon labels are the rule rather than the exception. They're just one example of a slew of "carefully cultivated myths" created by the bourbon industry.
NPR

Carson Touts Candor As A Plus For His GOP Presidential Bid

Neurosurgeon Ben Carson is a darling of conservatives. It started when he criticized President Obama's health care law and other policies at a Prayer Breakfast with the president just a few feet away.
NPR

As Emoji Spread Beyond Texts, Many Remain [Confounded Face] [Interrobang]

There's a growing tendency to bring the tiny hieroglyphs off of phones, but not everyone is fluent. New takes on emoji integration suggest misunderstanding may be remedied with universal translation.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.