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Supreme Court Won't Hear Appeal On Detention Of Frederick Immigrant

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The Supreme Court will not overturn a lower court's ruling that Frederick County sheriffs broke the law when they detained, searched and arrested an undocumented immigrant who was eating lunch in a supermarket parking lot.

The Supreme Court's decision not to hear the appeal means that the county must go back to a lower court and face responsibility for the actions of its deputies back in 2008.

"They found that these police officers had no authority to seize or arrest Roxanna. They are state police officers. They cannot engage in the enforcement of immigration laws," says Enid Gonzalez, who represents undocumented immigrant Roxanna Santos.

The county says Santos raised suspicion by trying to hide as the deputies drove past her as she ate lunch outside her workplace. Frederick County Sheriff Charles Jenkins, whose department has aggressively targeted undocumented immigrants, blasted the lawsuit when it was filed in 2009.

"I find it deplorable and disgusting that the groups involved in this lawsuit would try and defame these deputies, the agency, for what is clearly their agenda," Jenkins said.

The lower court must now determine if the county faces financial responsibility for detaining Santos illegally.

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