Poll Finds Residents Split On D.C. United Stadium, Cynical On Corruption | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Poll Finds Residents Split On D.C. United Stadium, Cynical On Corruption

A rendering of the proposed D.C. United stadium at Buzzard Point in Southwest D.C.
D.C. United
A rendering of the proposed D.C. United stadium at Buzzard Point in Southwest D.C.

A poll conducted by WAMU's The Kojo Nnamdi Show and Washington City Paper finds that D.C. residents are:

  • split on the merits of a new stadium for D.C. United
  • believe that corruption is deeply embedded in the city's political system
  • are inclined to support the full legalization of marijuana

The poll, which also found Mayor Vincent Gray and Council member Muriel Bowser neck and neck in the mayoral race, finds that support for a $300 million D.C. United stadium split: 44 percent of respondents say the team should pay for the stadium and the city for land and infrastructure improvements, while the same number says that D.C. should pay none of the costs for the stadium, which would be located in Southwest D.C.

Under a current plan that has yet to be finalized, D.C. would offer up the land and infrastructure improvements for the stadium, an investment worth $150 million. The team would pay to build the 20,000-seat stadium, which would cost $150 million.

Supporters of the stadium have been lobbying Gray and members of the D.C. Council to finalize the deal.

A Washington Post poll from January found that six in 10 residents opposed using city funds for the stadium deal, but supporters of the plan criticized the wording of the poll's question. A February poll commissioned by the D.C. Working Families Coalition put support for the current deal at 49 percent.

The KNS/City Paper poll also finds that 58 percent of respondents think the resignations of two D.C. Council members over the last three years and an ongoing investigation into Gray's 2010 campaign are part of a deeper culture of political corruption, while 17 percent believe they are isolated incidents.

As we reported last week, by a two-to-one margin, respondents also say they believe D.C. businessman Jeffrey Thompson over Gray on claims that he knew of the illicit fundraising that benefited his 2010 campaign.

Forty-nine percent of respondents say they would vote to legalize the possession of small amounts of marijuana, while 33 percent are opposed. A pro-legalization group is trying to place an initiative on the November ballot that would legalize possession of less than two ounces of marijuana. The D.C. Council recently voted to decriminalize possession.

Below are other findings from the poll, which was conducted by national firm Public Policy Polling between March 13-16 and reached 860 residents on landline phones. The margin of error is plus or minus 3.3 percent. A full interactive graph of the poll's results can be seen here.

  • 41 percent of respondents say D.C. should redraw its school boundaries and feeder patterns, 28 percent say it should not and 31 percent are unsure.
  • 42 percent of respondents think D.C. should give more tax incentives to TV and movie producers to entice them to film in the city.
  • 44 percent say they love eating and drinking at the new bars and restaurants at and around 14th and U Streets NW, while 22 percent say changes in the area are exciting but that the offerings are too expensive. Nine percent say that the increase in bars and restaurants is a bad example of how the city should develop.
  • 31 percent of respondents say the D.C. Council should have allowed the election of an attorney general this year as was originally planned when residents voted on a referendum in 2010 that would move D.C. to an elected, not appointed, attorney general. Twenty-six percent say the Council did the wrong thing in delaying the election until 2018, while 24 percent say it did the right thing.
  • 45 percent say a new D.C. minimum wage of $11.50 per hour is too low, while 43 percent say it's the right amount.
  • 33 percent say they spent between $1,000 and $2,000 a month on housing, 22 percent say they spend between $2,001 and $3,000, and 15 percent say they spend less than $1,000.

Early voting is currently taking place at 13 voting centers across D.C.

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