Remember Fat-Free Mania? Take Our Survey | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

NPR : News

Filed Under:

Remember Fat-Free Mania? Take Our Survey

If it was fat-free, it was good for us. That was the message we got from food marketers in the 1990s.

Just look back at some of the food ads from the era. Granola bars were healthy, as long as you removed the fat and added in some sugar. Same with yogurt: Skim off the fat, add sugar.

Remember SnackWells, fat-free Fig Newtons and the launch of TCBY frozen yogurt? Even super-models were eating low-fat chips without guilt.

So, did you get sucked in by the 1990s fat-free obsession? We want to know. So we've created a survey (see below). It's short, we promise.

Why look back at the fat-free craze now? As we reported this week, the scientific community is re-thinking the role of fat in our diet.

And it's a controversial topic.

A study published earlier this week concludes that there's not strong evidence to support the dietary guidelines to limit saturated fat.

But the American Heart Association says the study's conclusion could be "deceptive for some people" as they try to decide what's healthy to eat.

"You might think, 'I guess I don't need to worry about saturated fat,' and that's not true," writes Linda Van Horn, a registered dietitian and professor of preventive medicine at Northwestern University who is also a spokesperson for the American Heart Association.

Did the 1990s fat-free mania influence your eating habits then? And what about now?

Fill out our survey below by 12 p.m. EST on Monday, March 23.

We may include your responses in our two-part series next week, airing on Morning Edition.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Not My Job: Travel Guru Rick Steves Gets Quizzed On Steve Ricks

Since we specialize in asking people things they know nothing about, we've decided to ask Rick Steves three questions about the people out there in the world who have his name, but reversed.
NPR

Syrup Induces Pumpkin-Spiced Fever Dreams

Hugh Merwin, an editor at Grub Street, bought a 63-ounce jug of pumpkin spice syrup and put it in just about everything he ate for four days. As he tells NPR's Scott Simon, it did not go well.
NPR

Texas Gubernatorial Candidates Go The Border To Court Voters

Republicans have won every statewide office in Texas for 20 years, but the growing Hispanic population tends to vote Democrat, and the GOP's survival may depend on recruiting Hispanic supporters.
NPR

Tech Week: Smartphone Privacy, Cyberstalking, Alibaba's Big Debut

Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba makes the biggest debut on the NYSE ever. The details, and the other tech stories that piqued our interest, are in this week's roundup.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.