Trial Board Continues For D.C. Firefighters, But Daughter Of Deceased Man Kicked Out | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Trial Board Continues For D.C. Firefighters, But Daughter Of Deceased Man Kicked Out

The hearing continues today for the D.C. firefighters who failed to help 77-year-old Medric Mills, Jr. as he was suffering a heart attack across the street from their station. The daughter of that man was kicked out of the hearing this morning.

After reporters were kicked out of the first hearing on Wednesday, seven local media organizations, including WAMU, sent a letter requesting it be open, or for some explanation.

This morning, Deputy Mayor for Public Safety Paul Quander responded, writing the Trial Board had the authority to close the meeting, for the "safety and fairness" of those involved.

Marie Mills and her attorney were allowed into the hearing room, but only for about five minutes -- long enough to be told they would not be allowed to observe the proceedings.

"My feeling is that we will never know what happened because justice has not and will not be served, because it's in the hands of incompetent people," Mills said.

Mills and her lawyer, Karen Evans, were told that they -- and the rest of the public -- had to stay out for the "safety and fairness" of those involved.

"I asked these people, 'Do you believe that Miss Mills, me, Karen Evans pose a safety risk to the participants? Really? Really?'" Evans said.

Evans says she's now seeking a copy of the hearing transcripts.

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