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As Purple Line Moves Forward, Supporters Convene

The Purple Line Corridor Coalition met for the first time Friday on the presumption the 16-mile light rail project will be built, and it's looking like it will be.

This week, the federal government issued its final environmental approval—an important milestone. Now the Maryland Transit Administration can begin condemning private properties currently standing in the Purple Line's planned route.

"There will be opposition. We already know there is opposition and where it is coming from," says Gerrit Knaap, a coalition member and the director of the National Center for Smart Growth at the University of Maryland. "I am hopeful we can resolve these issues amicably without reverting to lawsuits, but it is really hard to predict these things."

He says the coalition's work will consist of showing communities along the right-of-way the benefits of light rail—"in terms of walkable communities and high-density development."

More than 100 homes and business may be displaced by construction. Work on the $2.4 billion Purple Line could begin in 2015 and last about five years.

NPR

Why Does Every New Restaurant Look Like A Factory?

The stripped-down look of exposed brick, poured cement floors, and Edison light bulbs is popular in restaurants across America. One reporter dares to ask, "Seriously, why?"
NPR

1 In 10 People May Face Malnutrition As Fish Catches Decline

Many people around the world rely on fish not just for protein but for critical micronutrients like iron and zinc. So declining fisheries pose major risks for global health, scientists warn.
NPR

Bipartisan Disapproval Follows Bill Clinton's Meeting With Loretta Lynch

"I think it's ... one of the big stories of this week of this month, of this year," Donald Trump said of the meeting. A Democratic strategist said it was "foolish to create such optics."
NPR

'Future Shock' Author Alvin Toffler Dies at 87

Toffler's warnings about 'information overload' and the accelerating pace of change in modern society made his seminal 1970 book a best-seller in the U.S. and around the world.

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