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Analysis: National Women's History Museum May Soon Be A Reality

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A museum dedicated to women may soon get a spot on the National Mall.

The proposal promoting the creation of a National Women's History museum has been circulating in Congress for years, but has never made it out of both chambers. According to The Hill, it now has the support of House Majority Leader Eric Cantor's (R-Va.) office, which could boost momentum for the effort in the weeks to come.

David Hawkings, Hawkings Here columnist for Roll Call, discusses the significance of Rep. Cantor's support with WAMU host Matt Bush and considers why the bill may have a better chance of passing this year.

Correction: In the audio, David Hawkings tells WAMU host Matt Bush that Reps. Donna Edwards (D-Md.), Elijah Cummings (D-Md.), Dutch Ruppersberger (D-Md.) and John Sarbanes (D-Md.) had not signed onto a letter calling on the president to issue an executive order protecting employees of federal contractors from discrimination based on gender or sexual orientation. At the time of airing, all four lawmakers had signed the letter.


From 'Unproud' To 'Hombre,' Election 2016 Is Testing Our Vocabulary

Merriam-Webster noticed the number of unique words coming out of this campaign, and has been using Twitter to report the most searchable words. Lexicographer Peter Sokolowski talks to Rachel Martin.

A History Of Election Cake And Why Bakers Want To #MakeAmericaCakeAgain

Bakers Susannah Gebhart and Maia Surdam are reviving election cake: a boozy, dense fruitcake that was a way for women to participate in the democratic process before they had the right to vote.

Republican And Trump Critic Ana Navarro Speaks On Election

Ana Navarro has become a standard bearer for Republican women repudiating Donald Trump. NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with the GOP strategist about her view of the election, which is only 16 days away.

The Next Generation Of Local, Low-Power FM Stations Expands In Urban Areas

The next wave of low power FM stations is coming on the air. Initially restricted to rural areas because of interference concerns, nearly 2,000 new stations have been approved — many in urban areas.

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