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Charles Severance Back In Court For Bond Hearing

A composite sketch of the Alexandria shooter and a mug shot of Charles Stanard Severance, who is wanted for questioning.
WV Regional Jail & Correctional Facility Authority
A composite sketch of the Alexandria shooter and a mug shot of Charles Stanard Severance, who is wanted for questioning.

Charles Severance, the man linked to an investigation into three high-profile murders in Alexandria, will be back in court today.

Charles Severance is expected to appear today in West Virginia Circuit Court for a bond hearing. His defense attorney says he will fight extradition back to Virginia, where he is wanted on a weapons charge in Loudoun County.

Prosecutors say the man wanted for questioning in connection to three unsolved murders in Alexandria knew police wanted to speak with him when he left for West Virginia and that he is a flight risk.

Scott Smith, who is a prosecutor in Ohio County, West Virginia, says Severance is a suspect in the Alexandria killings and should be kept in jail because he is a danger to the community. Police here in Alexandria say he has not yet been charged with anything, although they add he is one of many suspects that they are looking at.

The 53-year-old man ran for mayor of the city twice and once ran against Congressman Jim Moran, an election that saw him ejected from a candidate forum after he took a swing at an organizer.

The judge scheduled his extradition hearing for March 31.

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