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King Street Bike Lanes Approved

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This stretch of King Street between West Cedar St. and Janney's Lane in Alexandria will soon get bike lanes.
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This stretch of King Street between West Cedar St. and Janney's Lane in Alexandria will soon get bike lanes.

The Alexandria City Council has voted to create bicycle lanes on the city's busy King Street after debating a plan that will eliminate some parking spaces.

The city council voted unanimously over the weekend to approve the plan recommended by the city's transportation chief. The plan calls for removing 27 parking spaces west of Old Town to make room for bike lanes between Janneys Lane to West Cedar Street.

Advocates for the bike lanes said more people are using bicycles for commuting and that having bike lanes is key to the future of cities like Alexandria. But opponents says many people live more suburban lifestyles that require cars.

Bicyclists will have to share the traffic lanes with cars in areas where parking is still allowed.

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