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Cheer Up Federal Workers, The Senate Wants To Decrease Your Workload

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Sen. Mark Warner (D-Va.) says his new bill to eliminate unnecessary government reports could boost morale in the federal workforce.

In recent years federal workers have had pay freezes and pay cuts from forced furlough days. Many were also locked out of their offices during the partial government shutdown. Senator Warner says on top of that, dozens of federal workers are required to compile reports that no one reads, like an update on violations of the Dog and Cat Fur Protection Act – which had one violation over five years.

Warner says eliminating those reports could boost morale in agencies.

"So morale is tough now. Add on that you may be stuck doing a report that you know is never going to see the light of day and it's just crazy," Warner says. "So this is a kind of common sense small step."

The legislation is cosponsored by New Hampshire Republican Senator Kelly Ayotte.

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