WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Washington Ballet Celebrates 50th Anniversary Of British Invasion

The Washington Ballet company members Chong Sun, Andile Ndlovu, Jonathan Jordan and Jared Nelson strike a pose for "British Invasion: The Beatles & The Rolling Stones."
Tony Brown
The Washington Ballet company members Chong Sun, Andile Ndlovu, Jonathan Jordan and Jared Nelson strike a pose for "British Invasion: The Beatles & The Rolling Stones."

A local dance company is paying tribute to rock royalty with an upcoming performance.

This year marks the 50th anniversary of both The Beatles' and The Rolling Stones' first concerts in the United States. The Washington Ballet is celebrating those landmark appearances with a rock-infused program.

Artistic Director Septime Webre says art is most powerful when people see themselves on stage, and that using these familiar fan favorites gives audience members a hook into the world of ballet.

"We have been a rarified art form, and a lot of people conceive that our language of ballet is useful to express the lives of swans, but perhaps not men and women of today's society, and I think we're proving them wrong with this timely program," Webre says.

He says he wants audience members to see themselves as ballet goers, so perhaps next time when the music is more traditional, folks won't be afraid to attend.

British Invasion: The Beatles & The Rolling Stones will be on stage at The Kennedy Center through March 9.

NPR

Why Does Every New Restaurant Look Like A Factory?

The stripped-down look of exposed brick, poured cement floors, and Edison light bulbs is popular in restaurants across America. One reporter dares to ask, "Seriously, why?"
NPR

Why Does Every New Restaurant Look Like A Factory?

The stripped-down look of exposed brick, poured cement floors, and Edison light bulbs is popular in restaurants across America. One reporter dares to ask, "Seriously, why?"
WAMU 88.5

Why Local Nonprofits Haven't Fixed Poverty

As long as there has been poverty, there have been people trying to end it. We explore the obstacles and inefficiencies local nonprofits run into when trying to solve society's stubborn problem.

WAMU 88.5

Can We Trust Our Cars?

There were more airbag recalls this week, and VW has agreed to pay nearly fifteen billion in its emissions cheating scandal. Meanwhile, cars with driverless technology are becoming available, but whether they will make us safer is up for debate. A look at auto safety and consumer trust.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.