Cities Take The Lead In Regulating Electronic Cigarettes | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

NPR : News

Filed Under:

Cities Take The Lead In Regulating Electronic Cigarettes

Count Los Angeles as the latest big city to say no to electronic cigarettes.

The City Council there voted unanimously on Tuesday to ban use of the devices, which release vaporized nicotine, in almost all public places, including bars, workplaces and beaches.

If the mayor signs the ordinance, L.A. will follow New York and Chicago in restricting use of e-cigs, much as they do old-fashioned, smoke-producing cigarettes. San Francisco is considering a ban, too.

The Food and Drug Administration is working on proposed regulations on e-cigarettes, but is hampered by the fact that there's very little data on whether inhaling nicotine vapor is hazardous to health, to the vaper or to people nearby. As the FDA's website notes:

Additionally, it is not known if e-cigarettes may lead young people to try other tobacco products, including conventional cigarettes, which are known to cause disease and lead to premature death.

That lack of data is fueling efforts by proponents of vaping, including cigarette manufacturers, to push back against restrictions on advertising, sale and use of e-cigarettes.

But tobacco control advocates say they've seen it all before.

"I feel like I'm in a time machine," Dr. Stanton Glantz, director of the University of California, San Francisco's Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education, told the San Francisco Chronicle Monday, when that city's proposed ban was unveiled.

"I was here and participating in 1983 when San Francisco passed a smoking law," Glantz says, "and it was the same arguments - that it would destroy freedom, that it would destroy America, that it would ruin everything. That there was no evidence secondhand smoke is dangerous. It was not true when we were talking about secondhand smoke in 1983, and it's not true when we are talking about e-cigarettes now."

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

How'd A Cartoonist Sell His First Drawing? It Only Took 610 Tries

Tom Toro was a directionless 20-something film school dropout. Then, after an inspired moment at a used book sale, he started submitting drawings to The New Yorker ... and collecting rejection slips.
NPR

Will Environmentalists Fall For Faux Fish Made From Plants?

A handful of chefs and food companies are experimenting with fish-like alternatives to seafood. But the market is still a few steps behind plant-based products for meat and dairy.
NPR

Will We See Veto Battles On Capitol Hill?

With President Obama promising to vetoes, what are the possibilities of a few veto overrides during the next two years? NPR's Arun Rath puts that questions to the National Journal's Fawn Johnson.
NPR

3 Voices, 1 Threat: Personal Stories Of Cyberhacking

In President Obama's State of the Union address, he gave fresh emphasis to a problem that has been in the headlines: cybersecurity. Here are three people who have experienced security breaches.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.