Cuccinelli Takes On New Role: Gun Rights Lawyer Of The People | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Cuccinelli Takes On New Role: Gun Rights Lawyer Of The People

Ken Cuccinelli has moved on from life as Virginia's attorney general, and he now represents gun owners facing legal troubles.
Gage Skidmore:mhttp://www.flickr.com/photos/gageskidmore/6238582161/
Ken Cuccinelli has moved on from life as Virginia's attorney general, and he now represents gun owners facing legal troubles.

Virginia's former attorney general Ken Cuccinelli wants to make sure the government doesn't take away your lawful gun, and he's doing something about it.

If you got a gun and $9 a month, then you got a lawyer. In a bid to become the Johnnie Cochran of gun owners, Cuccinelli has established a law firm specializing in Second Amendment rights.

For $100 a year, any gun owners can keep his Virginia Self Defense Law firm on retainer, allowing them to be represented if they use their gun to defend themselves or if they are harassed by law enforcement officials while lawfully carrying a weapon.

The firm's website includes news stories about legal woes faced by gun owners, as well as the legal expenses racked up by George Zimmerman, the Florida man acquitted last year of killing Trayvon Martin, an unarmed teenager.

Cuccinelli's firm — whose slogan is "Defending those who defend themselves" — says it's filling a "market need."

WAMU 88.5

Art Beat With Lauren Landau, Sept. 18

You can attend an annual Latin American film festival or see a new play about strength, war and family.

NPR

From Coffee To Chicory To Beer, 'Bitter' Flavor Can Be Addictive

If you don't think you like bitter foods, try them again. Jennifer McLagan, the author of Bitter: A Taste of the World's Most Dangerous Flavor, is on a mission to change hearts and minds.
NPR

Ukraine's Poroshenko Thanks Congress For Supporting Freedom

Petro Poroshenko arrives in the U.S. to meet with the president and others to lobby for increased aid to his embattled government.
NPR

3.7 Million Comments Later, Here's Where Net Neutrality Stands

A proposal about how to maintain unfettered access to Internet content drew a bigger public response than any single issue in the Federal Communication Commission's history. What's next?

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.