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Cuccinelli Takes On New Role: Gun Rights Lawyer Of The People

Ken Cuccinelli has moved on from life as Virginia's attorney general, and he now represents gun owners facing legal troubles.
Gage Skidmore:mhttp://www.flickr.com/photos/gageskidmore/6238582161/
Ken Cuccinelli has moved on from life as Virginia's attorney general, and he now represents gun owners facing legal troubles.

Virginia's former attorney general Ken Cuccinelli wants to make sure the government doesn't take away your lawful gun, and he's doing something about it.

If you got a gun and $9 a month, then you got a lawyer. In a bid to become the Johnnie Cochran of gun owners, Cuccinelli has established a law firm specializing in Second Amendment rights.

For $100 a year, any gun owners can keep his Virginia Self Defense Law firm on retainer, allowing them to be represented if they use their gun to defend themselves or if they are harassed by law enforcement officials while lawfully carrying a weapon.

The firm's website includes news stories about legal woes faced by gun owners, as well as the legal expenses racked up by George Zimmerman, the Florida man acquitted last year of killing Trayvon Martin, an unarmed teenager.

Cuccinelli's firm — whose slogan is "Defending those who defend themselves" — says it's filling a "market need."

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