WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

D.C. Sees Another Bump In Public School Enrollment

Enrollment in D.C. traditional and public charter schools increased by three percent in the 2013-2014 school year, the fifth consecutive year of growth in the city's school system.

As in years past, enrollment in charter schools grew more aggressively, increasing by 1,891 students to 36,565 — a five percent jump. Enrollment in D.C. public schools grew by two percent, with 836 new students bringing the system's tally to 46,393.

Enrollment in both traditional and public charter schools has grown since it hit a low of 70,922 in 2008-09. With this year's increases, there are 82,958 students attending either a public or a public charter school.

Charter school enrollment has steadily grown since 2000-01, when it stood at just over 10,000. At the same time, enrollment in traditional public schools fell dramatically from 65,000 that year until 2009-10, when it finally stabilized and started growing slowly.

The audit also found that traditional and charter schools educate 7,331 English language learners and 11,043 special education students.

SY13-14 Enrollment Audit Overview (2.26.2014)[1]

NPR

Woody Allen Presents First TV Series, 'Crisis In Six Scenes,' On Amazon

Woody Allen's first foray into television, Crisis in Six Scenes, debuts on Amazon Friday. The series is a six-part comedy set in the 1960s with a cast that includes Miley Cyrus.
NPR

Our Robot Overlords Are Now Delivering Pizza, And Cooking It On The Go

A Silicon Valley startup wants to use technology to solve the pizza paradox. It's a food that's meant to be delivered but never tastes quite as good upon arrival.
WAMU 88.5

The Politics Hour - September 30, 2016

D.C.'s statehood activists rally while the Council opens debate on a state constitution. An appeals court reviews Virginia's voter ID law. And Prince George's County contends with a spate of incidents involving sexual abuse of school kids.

NPR

Our Robot Overlords Are Now Delivering Pizza, And Cooking It On The Go

A Silicon Valley startup wants to use technology to solve the pizza paradox. It's a food that's meant to be delivered but never tastes quite as good upon arrival.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.