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Bowser, Gray, Orange, Catania Take In New Endorsements In Mayor's Race

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With a little more than a month to go until the D.C. primary, the endorsements in the mayor's race are starting to pour in. The latest winner: Council member Muriel Bowser, who scored the backing of EMILY's List.

EMILY's List — a political action committee that supports pro-choice candidates — credited Bowser's work as a Ward 4 Council member and her track record on economic development.

Bowser, who earned the backing of the Washington Post editorial page last week, isn't the only candidate pulling down endorsements:

  • Mayor Vincent Gray scored his fifth major union endorsement of the campaign: the D.C. Building Trades Council announced it will back the incumbent.
  • Council member Vincent Orange (D-At Large) won the backing of the UFCW. The local grocer's union said it's supporting Orange in part for helping lead the fight against Walmart during the debate over a so-called living wage for employees at large retail stores.
  • Council member David Catania (I-At Large), who is not officially running yet, has been endorsed by the Gay & Lesbian Victory Fund. Catania, who is gay, has had the backing of the group in previous campaigns.
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